World Trade Center in Popular Culture

World Trade Center In Popular Culture

The World Trade Center was a landmark building complex in Lower Manhattan, New York. The famous Twin Towers (1 and 2 WTC) were completed by 1973 and were among the tallest buildings in the world until their destruction in 2001. An iconic feature of the New York City skyline for nearly three decades, the World Trade Center has been featured in innumerable films, television shows, cartoons, computer games and comic books.

Read more about World Trade Center In Popular Culture:  Movies, Notable Movie Posters, Television, Video Games, Cartoons and Anime, Music, Comic Books and Graphic Novels

Famous quotes containing the words world, trade, center, popular and/or culture:

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