World Trade Center in Popular Culture

World Trade Center In Popular Culture

The World Trade Center was a landmark building complex in Lower Manhattan, New York. The famous Twin Towers (1 and 2 WTC) were completed by 1973 and were among the tallest buildings in the world until their destruction in 2001. An iconic feature of the New York City skyline for nearly three decades, the World Trade Center has been featured in innumerable films, television shows, cartoons, computer games and comic books.

Read more about World Trade Center In Popular Culture:  Movies, Notable Movie Posters, Television, Video Games, Cartoons and Anime, Music, Comic Books and Graphic Novels

Famous quotes containing the words popular culture, world, trade, center, popular and/or culture:

    Popular culture entered my life as Shirley Temple, who was exactly my age and wrote a letter in the newspapers telling how her mother fixed spinach for her, with lots of butter.... I was impressed by Shirley Temple as a little girl my age who had power: she could write a piece for the newspapers and have it printed in her own handwriting.
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    Children can’t be a center of life and a reason for being. They can be a thousand things that are delightful, interesting, satisfying, but they can’t be a wellspring to live from. Or they shouldn’t be.
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    That popular fable of the sot who was picked up dead-drunk in the street, carried to the duke’s house, washed and dressed and laid in the duke’s bed, and, on his waking, treated with all obsequious ceremony like the duke, and assured that he had been insane, owes its popularity to the fact that it symbolizes so well the state of man, who is in the world a sort of sot, but now and then wakes up, exercises his reason and finds himself a true prince.
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