Woody Allen Filmography

Woody Allen Filmography

Woody Allen is an award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. He has contributed to many projects as either writer, director, actor, or a combination of the three. Allen has also written four plays for the stage, and written sketches for the Broadway revue From A to Z, and the Broadway productions Don't Drink the Water (1966) and Play It Again, Sam (1969). His first film was the 1965 comedy What's New Pussycat?, which featured Allen as both writer and performer. His directorial debut was the 1966 film What's Up, Tiger Lily?, in which a dramatic Japanese spy movie was re-dubbed in English with completely new, comic dialog. According to Box Office Mojo, Allen's films have grossed a total of more than $575 million, with an average of $14 million per film.

In addition to works of fiction, Allen has appeared as himself in many documentaries and other works of non-fiction, including Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures, Wild Man Blues, and The Concert for New York City. He has also been the subject of and appeared in two documentaries about himself, To Woody Allen, From Europe with Love in 1980, and Woody Allen: A Life in Film in 2001. He also wrote for and contributed to a number of television series early in his career, including The Tonight Show as guest host.

Currently, all of the films he directed for United Artists and Orion Pictures between 1971 and 1992 are owned by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which acquired both studios in separate transactions.

Read more about Woody Allen Filmography:  Films, Television

Famous quotes containing the words woody allen, woody and/or allen:

    If Woody Allen were a Muslim, he’d be dead by now.
    Salman Rushdie (b. 1947)

    Dylan used to sound like a lung cancer victim singing Woody Guthrie. Now he sounds like a Rolling Stone singing Immanuel Kant.
    —Also quoted in Robert Shelton, No Direction Home, ch. 2, “Prophet Without Honor” (1986)

    Ah, but I was so much older then,
    I’m younger than that now.
    Bob Dylan [Robert Allen Zimmerman] (b. 1941)