Who is james russell lowell?

James Russell Lowell

James Russell Lowell (/ˈloʊəl/; February 22, 1819 – August 12, 1891) was an American Romantic poet, critic, editor, and diplomat. He is associated with the Fireside Poets, a group of New England writers who were among the first American poets who rivaled the popularity of British poets. These poets usually used conventional forms and meters in their poetry, making them suitable for families entertaining at their fireside.

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Famous quotes containing the words russell lowell, james, russell and/or lowell:

    How like a prodigal doth nature seem,
    When thou, for all thy gold, so common art!
    Thou teachest me to deem
    More sacredly of every human heart,
    Since each reflects in joy its scanty gleam
    Of Heaven, and could some wondrous secret show,
    Did we but pay the love we owe,
    And with a child’s undoubting wisdom look
    On all these living pages of God’s book.
    —James Russell Lowell (1819–1891)

    Well, well, Henry James is pretty good, though he is of the nineteenth century, and that glaringly.
    Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–1894)

    There comes Poe, with his raven, like Barnaby Rudge,
    Three-fifths of him genius, and two-fifths sheer fudge.
    Who talks like a book of iambs and pentameters,
    In a way to make people of common sense damn metres,
    Who has written some things quite the best of their kind,
    But the heart somehow seems all squeezed out by the mind.
    —James Russell Lowell (1819–1891)

    “There is Lowell, who’s striving Parnassus to climb
    With a whole bale of isms tied together with rhyme,
    He might get on alone, spite of brambles and boulders,
    But he can’t with that bundle he has on his shoulders,
    The top of the hill he will ne’er come nigh reaching
    Till he learns the distinction ‘twixt singing and preaching;
    —James Russell Lowell (1819–1891)