Who is harriet beecher stowe?

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) was a depiction of life for African-Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential both for her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day.

Read more about Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Famous quotes containing the words harriet beecher stowe, beecher stowe, harriet beecher, beecher and/or stowe:

    The longest day must have its close—the gloomiest night will wear on to a morning. An eternal, inexorable lapse of moments is ever hurrying the day of the evil to an eternal night, and the night of the just to an eternal day.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    What makes saintliness in my view, as distinguished from ordinary goodness, is a certain quality of magnanimity and greatness of soul that brings life within the circle of the heroic.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    The obstinancy of cleverness and reason is nothing to the obstinancy of folly and inanity.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    What makes saintliness in my view, as distinguished from ordinary goodness, is a certain quality of magnanimity and greatness of soul that brings life within the circle of the heroic.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    Whatever offices of life are performed by women of culture and refinement are thenceforth elevated; they cease to be mere servile toils, and become expressions of the ideas of superior beings.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)