Who is fannie barrier williams?

Fannie Barrier Williams

Fannie Barrier Williams (February 12, 1855 – March 4, 1944) was an African American educator and political and women's rights activist. She became well known for her efforts to have blacks officially represented on the Board of Control of the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893.

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Famous quotes containing the words fannie barrier williams, barrier williams, fannie barrier, barrier and/or williams:

    In nothing was slavery so savage and relentless as in its attempted destruction of the family instincts of the Negro race in America. Individuals, not families; shelters, not homes; herding, not marriages, were the cardinal sins in that system of horrors.
    Fannie Barrier Williams (1855–1944)

    Whatever may be our just grievances in the southern states, it is fitting that we acknowledge that, considering their poverty and past relationship to the Negro race, they have done remarkably well for the cause of education among us. That the whole South should commit itself to the principle that the colored people have a right to be educated is an immense acquisition to the cause of popular education.
    —Fannie Barrier Williams (1855–1944)

    In nothing was slavery so savage and relentless as in its attempted destruction of the family instincts of the Negro race in America. Individuals, not families; shelters, not homes; herding, not marriages, were the cardinal sins in that system of horrors.
    Fannie Barrier Williams (1855–1944)

    The want of education and moral training is the only real barrier that exists between the different classes of men. Nature, reason, and Christianity recognize no other. Pride may say Nay; but Pride was always a liar, and a great hater of the truth.
    Susanna Moodie (1803–1885)

    no little brass rollers
    and small easy wheels on the bottom—
    my townspeople what are you thinking of!
    A rough plain hearse then
    with gilt wheels and no top at all.
    —William Carlos Williams (1883–1963)