Who is diane arbus?

Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus ( /diːˈæn ˈɑrbəs/; March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971) was an American photographer and writer noted for black-and-white square photographs of "deviant and marginal people (dwarfs, giants, transgender people, nudists, circus performers) or of people whose normality seems ugly or surreal.". Diane believed that a camera could be “a little bit cold, a little bit harsh” but its scrutiny revealed the truth; the difference between what people wanted others to see and what they really did see – the flaws. A friend said that Arbus said that she was "afraid . . . that she would be known simply as 'the photographer of freaks'"; however, that phrase has been used repeatedly to describe her.

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Famous quotes containing the words diane arbus, diane and/or arbus:

    If I were just curious, it would be very hard to say to someone, “I want to come to your house and have you talk to me and tell me the story of your life.” I mean people are going to say, “You’re crazy.” Plus they’re going to keep mighty guarded. But the camera is a kind of license. A lot of people, they want to be paid that much attention and that’s a reasonable kind of attention to be paid.
    Diane Arbus (1923–1971)

    Giving a camera to Diane Arbus is like putting a live grenade in the hands of a child.
    Norman Mailer (b. 1923)

    A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.
    —Diane Arbus (1923–1971)