West Midlands Bristol Road Bus Corridor - Current Routes

Current Routes

Number From To Via Current operator Image
61 Birmingham Frankley Lee Bank, Selly Oak, Northfield and Gannow National Express West Midlands

Previously operated between Birmingham and Gannow as part of the South Birmingham Bus Review in October 2010, the service was extended from Gannow to Rubery Great Park. However, from July 2010 the service has been cut back to operate from Birmingham to Frankley (Holly Hill Shops).

63 Birmingham Frankley Lee Bank, Selly Oak, Northfield, Longbridge and Rubery National Express West Midlands

Diamond Bus operated short journeys on the 64 route between Birmingham and Rubery, later renumbered to 63 on 22 July 2007. Diamond Bus ceased operation on the 63 route on 10 November 2007. Diamond Bus also operated a commercial 63N night service between September 2007 and April 2008. From 25 October 2009, the terminus of this service was changed from Rubery Great Park to Frankley as part of the South Birmingham Bus Review.

144 Birmingham Worcester Rubery, Marlbrook, Catshill, Bromsgrove, Droitwich First

Services on the 144 corridor running between Droitwich and Great Malvern go back to 1913, eventually being extended to Birmingham in 1914. At that time the route was numbered 25, and later 125. The 144 number came into use on 11 February 1928. The Malvern – Worcester section was withdrawn in 1976. Diamond Bus had a brief stint operating part of the route in competition with First.

98 Birmingham Rubery Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Selly Oak, Northfield, Longbridge and Rednal National Express West Midlands

Service 98 was introduced on July 22nd, 2012, to replace the previous limited stop X62 service between Birmingham Town Hall and Rubery. It follows the same route as the X62 from Rubery to Selly Oak (running as an all stops service, not limited stop) before leaving the Bristol Road at Harborne Lane, going on to serve Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University of Birmingham, Five Ways, Birmingham New Street railway station, Birmingham Moor Street railway station, and terminating at Colmore Row. Like the revised X64 route, the 98 does not use the previous terminus at Birmingham Town Hall.

X64 Birmingham Rubery Lee Bank, Selly Oak, Weoley Castle, Bangham Pit and Frankley National Express West Midlands

Other Notable Routes which use part of the Bristol Road or Interchange with the Bristol Road Services outside of the City Centre.

Number From To Via Current Operator
1 Town Hall Acocks Green Edgbaston Cricket Ground, Moseley, Springfield National Express West Midlands

Crosses the Bristol Road in Edgbaston and the Priory Road Crossroads.

11 Acocks Green Acocks Green Kings Heath, Cotteridge, Selly Oak, Harborne, Bearwood, Winson Green, Perry Barr, Ward End, Yardley National Express West Midlands

Birmingham Outer Circle Route meets the Bristol Road at Selly Oak

18 Yardley Wood Bartley Green Alcester Lanes End, Kings Norton, Cotteridge, Northfield, and Bangham Pit National Express West Midlands

Uses the Bristol Road through Northfield Centre

27 Maypole Hawkesley Yardley Wood, Kings Heath, Stirchley, Bournville, Northfield and West Heath National Express West Midlands

Uses the Bristol Road in Northfield Centre

49 Solihull Weoley Castle Shirley, Maypole, Kings Norton, Cotteridge, West Heath, Longbridge, Rubery, Frankley and Northfield National Express West Midlands

Uses the Bristol Road through Northfield Centre and between Rubery and Longbridge.

76 Solihull Queen Elizabeth Hospital Yardley Wood, Kings Heath, and Selly Oak National Express West Midlands

Uses the Bristol Road between Bournbrook and Selly Oak.

84 Hawkesley Queen Elizabeth Hospital Kings Norton, Cotteridge, Bournville and Selly Oak National Express West Midlands

Crosses the Bristol Road in Selly Oak

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