USS Kinsman (1854) - Kinsman Strikes A Snag in The River, Sinks With Loss of Six Men

Kinsman Strikes A Snag in The River, Sinks With Loss of Six Men

While transporting a detachment of troops 23 February 1863, Kinsman struck a snag and sank in Berwick Bay near Brashear City, Louisiana. Six men were reported missing.

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