Upper Middle Class

The upper middle class is a sociological concept referring to the social group constituted by higher-status members of the middle class. This is in contrast to the term "lower middle class", which is used for the group at the opposite end of the middle class stratum, and to the broader term "middle class". There is considerable debate as to how the upper middle class might be defined. According to sociologist Max Weber the upper middle class consists of well-educated professionals with graduate degrees and comfortable incomes.

The American upper middle class is defined similarly using income, education and occupation as the predominant indicators. In the United States, the upper middle class is defined as consisting mostly of white-collar professionals who not only have above-average personal incomes and advanced educational degrees but also a higher degree of autonomy in their work. The main occupational tasks of upper-middle-class individuals tend to center on conceptualizing, consulting, and instruction.

Read more about Upper Middle Class:  American Upper Middle Class, British Upper Middle Class

Famous quotes containing the words upper, middle and/or class:

    When my old wife lived, upon
    This day she was both pantler, butler, cook,
    Both dame and servant, welcomed all, served all,
    Would sing her song and dance her turn, now here
    At upper end o’the table, now i’the middle,
    On his shoulder, and his, her face afire
    With labor, and the thing she took to quench it
    She would to each one sip.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    The contented and economically comfortable have a very discriminating view of government. Nobody is ever indignant about bailing out failed banks and failed savings and loans associations.... But when taxes must be paid for the lower middle class and poor, the government assumes an aspect of wickedness.
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908)

    I know no East or West, North or South, when it comes to my class fighting the battle for justice. If it is my fortune to live to see the industrial chain broken from every workingman’s child in America, and if then there is one black child in Africa in bondage, there shall I go.
    Mother Jones (1830–1930)