University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UT Southwestern) is one of the leading medical education and biomedical research institutions in the United States. UT Southwestern is located in Southwestern Medical District, a 231-acre (0.93 km2) campus in Dallas incorporating UT Southwestern Medical School, UT Southwestern Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, UT Southwestern School of Health Professions, and five affiliated hospitals: Parkland Memorial Hospital, Children's Medical Center, Zale Lipshy University Hospital, and St. Paul University Hospital, as well as the Aston Ambulatory Care Center. It also has programs with affiliated hospitals at several sites in Dallas, Richardson, Fort Worth, Waco, Austin, and Wichita Falls.

Read more about University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center:  History, Academics, Patient Care, Library, Notable Alumni, Affiliated Healthcare Institutions

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