Tribute - Western European Notions of Tribute in Medieval Times

Western European Notions of Tribute in Medieval Times

Raiders, like Vikings and Celtic tribes, could also exact tribute instead of raiding the place if the potential targets agreed to pay an agreed amount of valuables.

Tribute was not always money, but also valuables, effectively making the payers hostages kept unpillaged in exchange for good behaviour.

Various medieval lords required tribute from their vassals or peasants, nominally in exchange for protection to incur the costs of raising armies, or paying for free-lance mercenaries against a hostile neighbouring state. That system evolved into medieval taxation and co-existed as a secular approximation of the churchly tithe levied on production

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