Treaty

A treaty is an express agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law, namely sovereign states and international organizations. A treaty may also be known as an (international) agreement, protocol, covenant, convention or exchange of letters, among other terms. Regardless of terminology, all of these forms of agreements are, under international law, equally considered treaties and the rules are the same.

Treaties can be loosely compared to contracts: both are means of willing parties assuming obligations among themselves, and a party to either that fails to live up to their obligations can be held liable under international law.

Read more about Treaty:  Modern Usage, Modern Form, Bilateral and Multilateral Treaties, Execution and Implementation, Invalid Treaties, Role of The United Nations, Treaties and Indigenous Peoples

Famous quotes containing the word treaty:

    It is accordance with our determination to refrain from aggression and build up a sentiment and practice among nations more favorable to peace ... that we have incurred the consent of fourteen important nations to the negotiation of a treaty condemning recourse to war, renouncing it as an instrument of national policy.
    Calvin Coolidge (1872–1933)

    No treaty is ever an impediment to a cheat.
    Sophocles (497–406/5 B.C.)

    There is between sleep and us something like a pact, a treaty with no secret clauses, and according to this convention it is agreed that, far from being a dangerous, bewitching force, sleep will become domesticated and serve as an instrument of our power to act. We surrender to sleep, but in the way that the master entrusts himself to the slave who serves him.
    Maurice Blanchot (b. 1907)