Tire

A tire (in American English and Canadian English) or tyre (in some Commonwealth Nations such as UK, Australia and New Zealand) is a ring-shaped covering that fits around a wheel rim to protect it and enable better vehicle performance by providing a flexible cushion that absorbs shock while keeping the wheel in close contact with the ground. The word itself may be derived from the word "tie," which refers to the outer steel ring part of a wooden cart wheel that ties the wood segments together (see Etymology below).

The fundamental materials of modern tires are synthetic rubber, natural rubber, fabric and wire, along with other compound chemicals. They consist of a tread and a body. The tread provides traction while the body ensures support. Before rubber was invented, the first versions of tires were simply bands of metal that fitted around wooden wheels to prevent wear and tear. Today, the vast majority of tires are pneumatic inflatable structures, comprising a doughnut-shaped body of cords and wires encased in rubber and generally filled with compressed air to form an inflatable cushion. Pneumatic tires are used on many types of vehicles, such as cars, bicycles, motorcycles, trucks, earthmovers, and aircraft.

Read more about Tire:  Etymology and Spelling, History, Manufacturing, Associated Components, Performance Characteristics, Vehicle Applications, Sound and Vibration Characteristics, Safety

Famous quotes containing the word tire:

    If we tire of the saints, Shakspeare is our city of refuge.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    For most visitors to Manhattan, both foreign and domestic, New York is the Shrine of the Good Time. “I don’t see how you stand it,” they often say to the native New Yorker who has been sitting up past his bedtime for a week in an attempt to tire his guest out. “It’s all right for a week or so, but give me the little old home town when it comes to living.” And, under his breath, the New Yorker endorses the transfer and wonders himself how he stands it.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    Never tire yourself more than necessary, even if you have to found a culture on the fatigue of your bones.
    Antonin Artaud (1896–1948)