Tie

Tie may refer to:

  • Necktie, a long piece of cloth worn around the neck or shoulders
    • Cravat, the forerunner to the modern tie
  • Tie (draw), a finish to a competition with identical results, particularly sports
  • Tie (engineering), a strong component designed to keep two objects closely linked together
  • Tie (information technology), a concept to bind a distributed object to a class
  • Tie (music), a musical notation symbol joining two notes without a break
  • Tie (typography), a punctuation and diacritical sign
  • Railroad tie, a rectangular support for the rail
  • Simpson Tie or Strong-Tie, a connector used in building
  • Interpersonal ties in sociology and psychology.

TIE may refer to:

  • TIE receptors, specific types of cell surface receptors
  • Tensilica Instruction Extension, a verilog like language that is used to describe the instruction extensions to the Xtensa processor core
  • Telx Internet Exchange
  • Times Interest Earned, a financial ratio
  • Transport Initiatives Edinburgh Ltd., an Edinburgh based public transport company
  • Titanium Metals Corporation, based on its stock symbol on the New York Stock Exchange
  • TIE fighter, a fictional spacecraft in the Star Wars universe

TiE may refer to

  • TiE (The Indus Entrepreneurs)

Famous quotes containing the word tie:

    Not because Socrates has said it, but because it is really in my nature, and perhaps a little more than it should be, I look upon all humans as my fellow-citizens, and would embrace a Pole as I would a Frenchman, subordinating this national tie to the common and universal one.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    No one can tear your thread out of himself.
    No one can tie you down or set you free.
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)

    The perception of the comic is a tie of sympathy with other men, a pledge of sanity, and a protection from those perverse tendencies and gloomy insanities in which fine intellects sometimes lose themselves. A rogue alive to the ludicrous is still convertible. If that sense is lost, his fellow-men can do little for him.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)