Tie

Tie may refer to:

  • Necktie, a long piece of cloth worn around the neck or shoulders
    • Cravat, the forerunner to the modern tie
  • Tie (draw), a finish to a competition with identical results, particularly sports
  • Tie (engineering), a strong component designed to keep two objects closely linked together
  • Tie (information technology), a concept to bind a distributed object to a class
  • Tie (music), a musical notation symbol joining two notes without a break
  • Tie (typography), a punctuation and diacritical sign
  • Railroad tie, a rectangular support for the rail
  • Simpson Tie or Strong-Tie, a connector used in building
  • Interpersonal ties in sociology and psychology.

TIE may refer to:

  • TIE receptors, specific types of cell surface receptors
  • Tensilica Instruction Extension, a verilog like language that is used to describe the instruction extensions to the Xtensa processor core
  • Telx Internet Exchange
  • Times Interest Earned, a financial ratio
  • Transport Initiatives Edinburgh Ltd., an Edinburgh based public transport company
  • Titanium Metals Corporation, based on its stock symbol on the New York Stock Exchange
  • TIE fighter, a fictional spacecraft in the Star Wars universe

TiE may refer to

  • TiE (The Indus Entrepreneurs)

Famous quotes containing the word tie:

    Nations have lost their old omnipotence; the patriotic tie does not hold. Nations are getting obsolete, we go and live where we will.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Despotism may govern without faith, but liberty cannot.... How is it possible that society should escape destruction if the moral tie is not strengthened in proportion as the political tie is relaxed? And what can be done with a people who are their own masters if they are not submissive to the Deity?
    Alexis de Tocqueville (1805–1859)

    You were born into a different world that will present you with different gifts and challenges. A new vision of manhood will be called for that does not tie so closely into the more aggressive and competitive residues of our male character. You will need to search out new ways of expressing strength, showing mastery, and exhibiting courage—ways that do not depend upon confronting the world before you as an adversary.
    Kent Nerburn (20th century)