The Doors of Perception

The Doors of Perception is a 1954 book by Aldous Huxley detailing his experiences when taking mescaline. The book takes the form of Huxley's recollection of a mescaline trip that took place over the course of an afternoon, and takes its title from a phrase in William Blake's poem The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Huxley recalls the insights he experienced, which range from the "purely aesthetic" to "sacramental vision". He also incorporates later reflections on the experience and its meaning for art and religion.

Read more about The Doors Of PerceptionBackground, Composition and Development, Synopsis, Reception, Later Experience, Influence, Cultural References, Publication History

Famous quotes containing the word doors:

    He took the props down used for propping open,
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