Texas Instruments TI-99/4A

Texas Instruments TI-99/4A


Texas Instruments TI-99/4

1979 TI-99/4 with RF modulator, optional Speech Synthesizer, keyboard overlays, and a cartridge. Note orange shift keys.
Type Home computer
Release date June, 1981 (99/4 in June, 1979)
Discontinued October, 1983
Operating system TI BASIC
CPU TI TMS9900 @ 3.0 MHz
Memory 256 bytes "scratchpad" RAM + 16 KB VDP (graphics RAM)

The Texas Instruments TI-99/4A was an early home computer, released in June 1981, originally at a price of US$525. It was an enhanced version of the less successful TI-99/4 model, which was released in late 1979 at a price of $1,150. The TI-99/4A added an additional graphics mode, "lowercase" characters consisting of small capitals, and a full travel keyboard. Its predecessor, the TI-99/4, featured a calculator-style chiclet keyboard and a character set that lacked lowercase text.

Read more about Texas Instruments TI-99/4A:  Features, Games, History, Successors and Clones, Technical Specifications, Reception, Contemporary Use, Modern Hardware Developments

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