Survivor Series (2003)

Survivor Series (2003) was the seventeenth annual Survivor Series professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) event produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). It was presented by Microsoft's Xbox. It took place on November 16, 2003 at the American Airlines Center in Dallas, Texas and featured talent from both Raw and SmackDown!.

The main match on the Raw brand was for the World Heavyweight Championship between Goldberg and Triple H, which Goldberg won by pinfall after performing a Spear and Jackhammer. The predominant match on the SmackDown! brand was a Buried Alive match between The Undertaker and Vince McMahon, which Vince won after Kane interfered and helped Vince bury Undertaker. This would also be marked as The Undertaker's last appearance portraying Big Evil/The American Badass, as he would return four months later at WrestleMania XX in his Deadman persona for the first time since mid-1999. The predominant match on the Raw brand was a 5 on 5 Traditional Survivor Series match between Team Bischoff (Chris Jericho, Christian, Randy Orton, Scott Steiner and Mark Henry) and Team Austin (Shawn Michaels, Rob Van Dam, Booker T, Bubba Ray Dudley, and D-Von Dudley). Team Bischoff won the match after Orton last eliminated Michaels. The main match on the card featured an Ambulance match between Kane and Shane McMahon, which Kane won after throwing Shane into the ambulance.

Read more about Survivor Series (2003):  Background, Event, Results

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