Surfer Girl (song) - Composition

Composition

Written solely by Brian Wilson, the song is his very first composition. Although the song is sometimes referred to as a tribute to his then girlfriend Judy Bowles, this is untrue as the song wasn't written with anyone particular in mind.

Brian explained the genesis of the song: "Back in 1961, I'd never written a song in my life. I was nineteen years old. And I put myself to the test in my car one day. I was actually driving to a hot dog stand, and I actually created a melody in my head without being able to hear it on a piano. I sang it to myself; I didn't even sing it out loud in the car. When I got home that day, I finished the song, wrote the bridge, put the harmonies together and called it 'Surfer Girl'."

Brian Wilson later stated that the song was inspired by the Dion and the Belmonts version of "When You Wish Upon a Star," which has the same AABA form. Wilson later covered that song on his album In the Key of Disney, which was released on October 25, 2011.

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