Supreme Court of Justice of The Nation

The Supreme Court of Justice of the Nation (Spanish: Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nación (SCJN) is the highest federal court in the United Mexican States. It consists of a President of the Supreme Court (Chief Justice) and ten Ministers (Associate Justices) who are confirmed by the Senate from a list proposed by the President of the Republic.

Justices of the SCJN are appointed from life. From among their number, the justices elect the President of the Court to serve a four-year period; a given justice may serve more than one term as president, but not in consecutive periods.

Read more about Supreme Court Of Justice Of The Nation:  Supreme Court Building, Current Composition, Chief Justices, Associate Justices (Minister)

Famous quotes containing the words supreme court, supreme, court, justice and/or nation:

    The Supreme Court would have pleased me more if they had concerned themselves about enforcing the compulsory education provisions for Negroes in the South as is done for white children. The next ten years would be better spent in appointing truant officers and looking after conditions in the homes from which the children come. Use to the limit what we already have.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    The Constitution and the laws are supreme and the Union indissoluble.
    Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)

    If a walker is indeed an individualist there is nowhere he can’t go at dawn and not many places he can’t go at noon. But just as it demeans life to live alongside a great river you can no longer swim in or drink from, to be crowded into safer areas and hours takes much of the gloss off walking—one sport you shouldn’t have to reserve a time and a court for.
    Edward Hoagland (b. 1932)

    Practically speaking, the opponents to a reform in Massachusetts are not a hundred thousand politicians at the South, but a hundred thousand merchants and farmers here, who are more interested in commerce and agriculture than they are in humanity, and are not prepared to do justice to the slave and to Mexico, cost what it may. I quarrel not with far-off foes, but with those who, near at home, coöperate with, and do the bidding of, those far away, and without whom the latter would be harmless.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Our young people have come to look upon war as a kind of beneficent deity, which not only adds to the national honor but uplifts a nation and develops patriotism and courage. That is all true. But it is only fair, too, to let them know that the garments of the deity are filthy and that some of her influences debase and befoul a people.
    Rebecca Harding Davis (1831–1910)