Standard Language

A standard language (also standard dialect or standardized dialect) is a language variety used by a group of people in their public discourse. Alternatively, varieties become standard by undergoing a process of standardization, during which it is organized for description in grammars and dictionaries and encoded in such reference works. Typically, varieties that become standardized are the local dialects spoken in the centers of commerce and government, where a need arises for a variety that will serve more than local needs. A standard language can be either pluricentric (e.g. English, German, Serbo-Croatian, French, and Portuguese) or monocentric (e.g. Icelandic).

A standard written language is sometimes termed by the German word Schriftsprache.

Read more about Standard Language:  Characteristics, List of Standard Languages and Regulators, Examples

Famous quotes containing the words standard and/or language:

    A dwarf who brings a standard along with him to measure his own size—take my word, is a dwarf in more articles than one.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    Nothing so fretful, so despicable as a Scribbler, see what I am, & what a parcel of Scoundrels I have brought about my ears, & what language I have been obliged to treat them with to deal with them in their own way;Mall this comes of Authorship.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)