Sprint Car Racing

Sprint Car Racing

Sprint cars are high-powered race cars designed primarily for the purpose of running on short oval or circular dirt or paved tracks. Sprint car racing is popular in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Sprint cars have a high power-to-weight ratio, making speeds in excess of 140 miles per hour (230 km/h) possible on some tracks. 630 horsepower (470 kW) is commonplace for these machines. The safety record of sprint car racing in recent years has been greatly improved by the use of roll cages to protect the drivers. Many IndyCar Series and NASCAR drivers used sprint car racing as an intermediate stepping stone on their way to more high profile divisions, including Indianapolis 500 winners A.J. Foyt, Mario Andretti, Johnny Rutherford, Parnelli Jones, Johnnie Parsons, and Al Unser Jr., as well as NASCAR Sprint Cup champions Jeff Gordon and Tony Stewart.

The National Sprint Car Hall of Fame & Museum located in Knoxville, Iowa, USA features exhibits to highlight the history of both winged and non-wing sprint cars.

Read more about Sprint Car Racing:  Non-winged Sprint Cars, Winged Sprint Cars, Sanctioning Bodies, Television Coverage in The United States, Safety Aspects

Famous quotes containing the words car and/or racing:

    The car has become the carapace, the protective and aggressive shell, of urban and suburban man.
    Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

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    Barbara Ehrenreich (b. 1941)