Spread

Spread may refer to:

  • Statistical dispersion
  • Spread (food), an edible paste put on other foods
  • the score difference being wagered on in spread betting
  • the measure of line inclination in rational trigonometry
  • Temperature-Dewpoint spread, dew point depression
  • Two-page spread a redundant term, also simply called "spread", referring to two adjacent, facing pages in a magazine or other publication with conjoined or connected content
  • In finance, the difference in price between related securities,
    • Bid-offer spread, between the buying and selling price of a commodity or security
    • Spread trade, between two related securities or commodities
    • Option-adjusted spread, on mortgage backed securities where the borrower has the right to repay in full
    • Yield spread, difference in percentage rate of return of two instruments
    • Yield curve spread, on mortgage backed securities
    • Credit spread (bond), on bonds
  • a term used for speed reading in policy debate.
  • The laying of Tarot cards for divinatory uses
  • Spread (film), a 2009 film

See also:

  • Seafloor spreading, the process leading to continental drift
  • Spread spectrum, communications signals over a range of frequencies
  • Spread offense, an offensive scheme in American football designed to stretch the field horizontally
  • Spread limit, a limit on a raise in poker
  • Spread polynomials, a polynomial sequence arising in rational trigonometry
  • $pread, a quarterly magazine by and for sex workers
  • "Spread", a song by OutKast from their 2003 album Speakerboxxx/The Love Below
  • Spread Toolkit - an open source toolkit that provides a high performance messaging service
  • Spreadsheet, computer application software

Famous quotes containing the word spread:

    Cap off
    and then what? The brains as
    helpless as oysters in a pint container,
    the nerves like phone wires.
    God, take care, take infinite care
    with the tumor lest it spread like grease.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    To-night she will spread her brown hair on his pillow,
    But I shall be hearing the harsh cries of wild fowl.
    Patrick MacDonogh (1902–1961)

    When I married Humphrey I made up my mind to like sermons, and I set out by liking the end very much. That soon spread to the middle and the beginning, because I couldn’t have the end without them.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian)