Shore

A shore or shoreline is the fringe of land at the edge of a large body of water, such as an ocean, sea, or lake. In Physical Oceanography a shore is the wider fringe that is geologically modified by the action of the body of water past and present, while the beach is at the edge of the shore, representing the intertidal zone where there is one. In contrast to a coast, a shore can border any body of water, while the coast must border an ocean; that is, a coast is a type of shore. Shore is often substituted for coast where an oceanic shore is meant.

Shores are influenced by the topography of the surrounding landscape, as well as by water induced erosion, such as waves. The geological composition of rock and soil dictates the type of shore which is created.

Famous quotes containing the word shore:

    We saw by the flitting clouds, by the first russet tinge on the hills, by the rushing river, the cottages on shore, and the shore itself, so coolly fresh and shining with dew, and later in the day, by the hue of the grape-vine, the goldfinch on the willow, the flickers flying in flocks, and when we passed near enough to the shore, as we fancied, by the faces of men, that the fall had commenced.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Flood-tide below me! I see you face to face!
    Clouds of the west—sun there half an hour
    high—I see you also face to face.
    Crowds of men and women attired in the usual costumes, how curious you are to me!
    On the ferry-boats the hundreds and hundreds that cross, returning
    home, are more curious to me than you suppose,
    And you that shall cross from shore to shore years hence are more to me, and more in my meditations, than you might suppose.
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892)

    Any man that resists the present tides that run in the world, will find himself thrown upon a shore so high and barren that it will seem he has been separated from his human kind forever.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)