Screen Actors Guild Award For Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor in A Leading Role

Screen Actors Guild Award For Outstanding Performance By A Male Actor In A Leading Role

The Screen Actors' Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role is an award presented annually by the Screen Actors Guild to honour the finest male acting achievements in a motion picture in a lead role. The award is presented at a ceremony alongside the other guild awards since the awards inception in 1994.

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    Kind are her answers,
    But her performance keeps no day;
    Breaks time, as dancers,
    From their own music when they stray.
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    The loneliest feeling in the world is when you think you are leading the parade and turn to find that no one is following you. No president who badly misguesses public opinion will last very long.
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    ... an actor is exactly as big as his imagination.
    Minnie Maddern Fiske (1865–1932)

    Shall it be male or female? say the cells,
    And drop the plum like fire from the flesh.
    Dylan Thomas (1914–1953)

    Western man represents himself, on the political or psychological stage, in a spectacular world-theater. Our personality is innately cinematic, light-charged projections flickering on the screen of Western consciousness.
    Camille Paglia (b. 1947)

    I recently learned something quite interesting about video games. Many young people have developed incredible hand, eye, and brain coordination in playing these games. The air force believes these kids will be our outstanding pilots should they fly our jets.
    Ronald Reagan (b. 1911)

    The award of a pure gold medal for poetry would flatter the recipient unduly: no poem ever attains such carat purity.
    Robert Graves (1895–1985)

    To save the theatre, the theatre must be destroyed, the actors and actresses must all die of the plague. They poison the air, they make art impossible. It is not drama that they play, but pieces for the theatre. We should return to the Greeks, play in the open air; the drama dies of stalls and boxes and evening dress, and people who come to digest their dinner.
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    The addition of a helpless, needy infant to a couple’s life limits freedom of movement, changes role expectancies, places physical demands on parents, and restricts spontaneity.
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