Saturn Sky

The Saturn Sky was the only roadster from the Saturn marque of American automaker General Motors, and was initially released in the first quarter of 2006 as a 2007 model. It uses the Kappa automobile platform shared with the Pontiac Solstice and Opel GT. The Sky concept was shown at the 2005 North American International Auto Show, with the production version following at the 2006 show. It was built at GM's Wilmington, Delaware plant, alongside the Solstice and the Opel GT. The Sky features 18-inch (457 mm) wheels and a 2.4 L Ecotec LE5 straight-4 engine that produces 177 hp (132 kW), a new straight-4 2.0 L turbocharged direct injected engine that makes 260 hp (194 kW) as well as a dealer-installed turbo upgrade kit that makes 290 hp (216 kW). Both five-speed manual and automatic transmissions are available.

The styling for the Sky, penned by Franz von Holzhausen, is based on the Vauxhall VX Lightning Concept's design. It is available in some European markets as the Opel GT. A rebadged version named the Daewoo G2X was unveiled as a concept vehicle for the South Korean market in 2006. The production version was released in September 2007. The Solstice, Sky, and GT were built in Delaware, as was the G2X until 2008. The aggressive styling garnered praise as a welcome departure from traditional Saturn design. The interior, however, was tight. The ride in the Red Line although firm is not at all punishing and is a comfortable enough to be a daily driver. The Wilmington Assembly plant closed in July 2009, ending production as both the Pontiac and Saturn nameplates were retired.

Read more about Saturn Sky:  Red Line, Specifications, Production By Model Year, Yearly American Sales

Famous quotes containing the words saturn and/or sky:

    The forehead and the little ears
    Have gone where Saturn keeps the years;
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    Has done with rising and with falling.
    Edwin Arlington Robinson (1869–1935)

    It is deep January. The sky is hard.
    The stalks are firmly rooted in ice.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)