Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as for his major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. He coined many familiar words and phrases, including the celebrated suspension of disbelief. He was a major influence, via Emerson, on American transcendentalism.

Throughout his adult life, Coleridge suffered from crippling bouts of anxiety and depression; it has been speculated by some that he suffered from bipolar disorder, a condition as yet unidentified during his lifetime. Coleridge suffered from poor health that may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these concerns with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction.

Read more about Samuel Taylor Coleridge:  Early Life, Poetry

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    Work without Hope draws nectar in a sieve,
    And Hope without an object cannot live.
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834)

    the eave-drops fall
    Heard only in the trances of the blast,
    Or if the secret ministry of frost
    Shall hang them up in silent icicles,
    Quietly shining to the quiet Moon.
    —Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834)

    That willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith.
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834)

    Hannah, why do you weep? Why do you not eat? Why is your heart sad? Am I not more to you than ten sons?
    Bible: Hebrew, 1 Samuel 1:8.

    Hannah’s husband.

    The Taylor and the Painter often contribute to the Success of a Tragedy more than the Poet. Scenes affect ordinary Minds as much as Speeches; and our Actors are very sensible, that a well-dressed Play has sometimes brought them as full Audiences, as a well-written one.... But however the Show and Outside of the Tragedy may work upon the Vulgar, the more understanding Part of the Audience immediately see through it, and despise it.
    Joseph Addison (1672–1719)

    A spring of love gushed from my heart,
    And I blessed them unaware:
    —Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834)