Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery - Royal Canadian Artillery Museum

Royal Canadian Artillery Museum
Location CFB Shilo, P.O. Box 5000, Stn Main, Shilo, Manitoba, Canada
Type Artillery Museum

As the principal Artillery Museum in Canada, the Royal Canadian Artillery Museum presents, acquires, preserves, researches and interprets the contributions of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery and the Canadian Military to the heritage of Canada. The museum is affiliated with: CMA, CHIN, OMMC and Virtual Museum of Canada.

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    An Englishman, methinks,—not to speak of other European nations,—habitually regards himself merely as a constituent part of the English nation; he is a member of the royal regiment of Englishmen, and is proud of his company, as he has reason to be proud of it. But an American—one who has made tolerable use of his opportunities—cares, comparatively, little about such things, and is advantageously nearer to the primitive and the ultimate condition of man in these respects.
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    We’re definite in Nova Scotia—’bout things like ships ... and fish, the best in the world.
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    [A] Dada exhibition. Another one! What’s the matter with everyone wanting to make a museum piece out of Dada? Dada was a bomb ... can you imagine anyone, around half a century after a bomb explodes, wanting to collect the pieces, sticking it together and displaying it?
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