Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery

The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery (Fr: le RĂ©giment royal de l'Artillerie canadienne) is the artillery personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF).

Read more about Royal Regiment Of Canadian Artillery:  History, Units of The Royal Canadian Artillery, Order of Precedence, Affiliations, Royal Canadian Artillery Museum, Other

Famous quotes containing the words royal regiment of, royal, regiment, canadian and/or artillery:

    An Englishman, methinks,—not to speak of other European nations,—habitually regards himself merely as a constituent part of the English nation; he is a member of the royal regiment of Englishmen, and is proud of his company, as he has reason to be proud of it. But an American—one who has made tolerable use of his opportunities—cares, comparatively, little about such things, and is advantageously nearer to the primitive and the ultimate condition of man in these respects.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    High on a throne of royal state, which far
    Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind,
    Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand
    Show’rs on her kings barbaric pearl and gold,
    Satan exalted sat, by merit raised
    To that bad eminence; and, from despair
    Thus high uplifted beyond hope, aspires
    Beyond thus high, insatiate to pursue
    Vain war with Heav’n, and by success untaught,
    His proud imaginations
    John Milton (1608–1674)

    We had an inspection today of the brigade. The Twenty-third was pronounced the crack regiment in appearance, ... [but] I could see only six to ten in a company of the old men. They all smiled as I rode by. But as I passed away I couldn’t help dropping a few natural tears. I felt as I did when I saw them mustered in at Camp Chase.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    We’re definite in Nova Scotia—’bout things like ships ... and fish, the best in the world.
    John Rhodes Sturdy, Canadian screenwriter. Richard Rossen. Joyce Cartwright (Ella Raines)

    We now demand the light artillery of the intellect; we need the curt, the condensed, the pointed, the readily diffused—in place of the verbose, the detailed, the voluminous, the inaccessible. On the other hand, the lightness of the artillery should not degenerate into pop-gunnery—by which term we may designate the character of the greater portion of the newspaper press—their sole legitimate object being the discussion of ephemeral matters in an ephemeral manner.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1845)