Royal Cornhill Hospital

The Royal Cornhill Hospital is a psychiatric hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. It is the main centre for the treatment of people with mental health problems in Grampian.

The hospital is situated on Westburn Road, East of the Foresterhill site.

NHS Grampian hospitals
Aberdeen
  • Aberdeen Maternity Hospital
  • Aberdeen Royal Infirmary
  • National Hyperbaric Centre
  • Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital
  • Royal Cornhill Hospital
  • Roxburghe House
  • Woodend Hospital
  • Woolmanhill Hospital
Aberdeenshire
  • Aboyne Hospital
  • Campbell Hospital
  • Chalmers Hospital
  • Fraserburgh Hospital
  • Glen O'Dee Hospital
  • Insch War Memorial Hospital
  • Inverurie Hospital
  • Jubilee Hospital
  • Kincardine Community Hospital
  • Maud Hospital
  • Peterhead Community Hospital
  • Turriff Cottage Hospital
  • Ugie Hospital
Moray
  • Dr Gray's Hospital
  • Fleming Cottage Hospital
  • Leanchoil Hospital
  • The Oaks
  • Seafield Hospital
  • Spynie Hospital
  • Stephen Cottage Hospital
  • Turner Memorial Hospital

Coordinates: 57°09′15″N 2°06′59″W / 57.1542°N 2.1164°W / 57.1542; -2.1164

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