Richard Nixon Supreme Court Candidates

Richard Nixon Supreme Court Candidates

President Richard Nixon entered office in 1969 with Chief Justice Earl Warren having announced his retirement from Supreme Court of the United States the previous year. Nixon appointed Warren E. Burger to replace Earl Warren, and during his time in office appointed three other members of the Supreme Court: Associate Justices Harry Blackmun, Lewis F. Powell, and William Rehnquist. Nixon also nominated G. Harrold Carswell and Clement Haynsworth for the vacancy that was ultimately filled by Blackmun, but the nominations were rejected by the United States Senate. Nixon's failed Supreme Court nominations were the first since Herbert Hoover's nomination of John J. Parker was rejected by the Senate.

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