Restoration Ecology

Restoration ecology emerged as a separate field in ecology in the 1980s. It is the scientific study supporting the practice of ecological restoration - which is the practice of renewing and restoring degraded, damaged, or destroyed ecosystems and habitats in the environment by active human intervention and action. The term "restoration ecology" is therefore commonly used for the academic study of the process, whereas "ecological restoration" is the term commonly used for the actual project or process by the restoration practitioners.

The Society for Ecological Restoration defines ecological restoration as an "intentional activity that initiates or accelerates the recovery of an ecosystem with respect to its health, integrity and sustainability". The practice of ecological restoration includes wide scope of projects including: erosion control, reforestation, the use of genetically local native species, removal of non-native species and weeds, revegetation of disturbed areas, daylighting streams, reintroduction of native species, as well as habitat and range improvement for targeted species.

In the view of biologist E. O. Wilson, "Here is the means to end the great extinction spasm. The next century will, I believe, be the era of restoration in ecology"

Read more about Restoration Ecology:  History, Restoration Needs, Conservation Biology and Restoration Ecology, Evolving Concepts, Application of Theory, Related Journals

Famous quotes containing the words restoration and/or ecology:

    Men who are occupied in the restoration of health to other men, by the joint exertion of skill and humanity, are above all the great of the earth. They even partake of divinity, since to preserve and renew is almost as noble as to create.
    Voltaire [Fran├žois Marie Arouet] (1694–1778)

    ... the fundamental principles of ecology govern our lives wherever we live, and ... we must wake up to this fact or be lost.
    Karin Sheldon (b. c. 1945)