Regiment

A regiment is a title used by some military units. The size of a regiment varies markedly, depending on the country and the arm of service.

Historically, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a full-strength regiment was typically supposed to be a thousand men, and was commanded by a colonel.

Today, there is no set size for a unit calling itself a "regiment", which may be:

  • Less than a battalion-equivalent, e.g. Regiment of Life Guards
  • A battalion-equivalent, e.g. 3rd Foreign Infantry Regiment
  • A number of battalions (or equivalents, such as US squadrons) e.g. Royal Regiment of Scotland, 2nd Infantry Regiment (United States)
  • An entire arm of service; In several commonwealth countries, the entire artillery arm is often titled "regiment" (e.g. the Regiment of Artillery), and may then be sub-divided into "field regiments".

Read more about Regiment:  Historical Origin, Regimental System, Commonwealth Armies, United States Army, United States Marine Corps, Russian Army, Irish Army

Famous quotes containing the word regiment:

    What makes a regiment of soldiers a more noble object of view than the same mass of mob? Their arms, their dresses, their banners, and the art and artificial symmetry of their position and movements.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)

    Christians would show sense if they dispatched these argumentative Scotists and pigheaded Ockhamists and undefeated Albertists along with the whole regiment of Sophists to fight the Turks and Saracens instead of sending those armies of dull-witted soldiers with whom they’ve long been carrying on war with no result.
    Desiderius Erasmus (c. 1466–1536)

    Simplicity of life, even the barest, is not a misery, but the very foundation of refinement; a sanded floor and whitewashed walls and the green trees, and flowery meads, and living waters outside; or a grimy palace amid the same with a regiment of housemaids always working to smear the dirt together so that it may be unnoticed; which, think you, is the most refined, the most fit for a gentleman of those two dwellings?
    William Morris (1834–1896)