Random Sample - Types of Random Sample

Types of Random Sample

  • A simple random sample is selected so that all samples of the same size have an equal chance of being selected from the entire population.
  • A self-weighting sample, also known as an EPSEM (Equal Probability of Selection Method) sample, is one in which every individual, or object, in the population of interest has an equal opportunity of being selected for the sample. Simple random samples are self-weighting.
  • Stratified sampling involves selecting independent samples from a number of subpopulations, group or strata within the population. Great gains in efficiency are sometimes possible from judicious stratification.
  • Cluster sampling involves selecting the sample units in groups. For example, a sample of telephone calls may be collected at by first taking a collection of telephone lines and collecting all the calls on the sampled lines. The analysis of cluster samples must take into account the intra-cluster correlation which reflects the fact that units in the same cluster are likely to be more similar than two units picked at random

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