Psychology of Religion

Psychology of religion consists of the application of psychological methods and interpretive frameworks to religious traditions, as well as to both religious and irreligious individuals. The science attempts to accurately describe the details, origins, and uses of religious beliefs and behaviours. Although the psychology of religion first arose as a self-conscious discipline as recently as the late 19th century, all three of these tasks have a history going back many centuries before that.

Many areas of religion remain unexplored by psychology. While religion and spirituality play a role in many people’s lives, it is uncertain how they lead to outcomes that are at times positive, and at other times negative. Thus, the pathways and outcomes that underlie these associations (and sometimes causations) need additional research. Continued dialogue between psychology and theology may foster greater understanding and benefit both fields.

Read more about Psychology Of Religion:  Overview, Psychometric Approaches To Religion, Developmental Approaches To Religion, Religion and Prayer, Religion and Ritual, Religion and Health, Evolutionary Psychology of Religion, Religion and Meditation, Controversy, Religion and Psychotherapy, Pastoral Psychology

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