Professional Wrestling Attacks

Professional Wrestling Attacks

Attacking maneuvers are offensive moves in professional wrestling, used to set up an opponent for a submission hold or for a throw. There are a wide variety of attacking moves in pro wrestling, and many moves are known by several different names. Professional wrestlers frequently give their finishers new names. Occasionally, these names become popular and are used regardless of the wrestler performing the technique.

Professional wrestling contains a variety of punches and kicks found in martial arts and other fighting sports; the moves listed below are more specific to wrestling itself. Many of the moves below can also be performed from a raised platform (the top rope, the ring apron, etc.); these are called aerial variations. Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible.

Read more about Professional Wrestling Attacks:  Bell Clap, Body Press, Bronco Buster, Clothesline, Double Axe Handle, Drops, Elbow, Facewash, Forearm Club, Forearm Smash, Headbutt, Knee Strikes, Hip Attack, Lariat, Leapfrog Body Guillotine, Punch, Senton, Shoulder Block, Standing Moonsault, Standing Shooting Star Press, Stink Face, Uppercut, Weapon Shot, Transition Moves, Illegal Attacks

Famous quotes containing the words professional, wrestling and/or attacks:

    The professional celebrity, male and female, is the crowning result of the star system of a society that makes a fetish of competition. In America, this system is carried to the point where a man who can knock a small white ball into a series of holes in the ground with more efficiency than anyone else thereby gains social access to the President of the United States.
    C. Wright Mills (1916–1962)

    There are people who think that wrestling is an ignoble sport. Wrestling is not sport, it is a spectacle, and it is no more ignoble to attend a wrestled performance of suffering than a performance of the sorrows of Arnolphe or Andromaque.
    Roland Barthes (1915–1980)

    I find that with me low spirits and feeble health come and go together. The last two or three months I have had frequent attacks of the blues. They generally are upon me or within me when I am somewhat out of order in bowels, throat, or head.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)