Power Plant

PowerPlant is an object-oriented GUI toolkit, application framework and set of class libraries for Mac OS, created by Metrowerks. The framework was fairly popular at the height of the Classic Mac OS era, and was primarily used with CodeWarrior. It was designed to work with a GUI editor called Constructor; unusually for such programs, Constructor was primarily a resource editor specializing primarily in UI elements, including several custom resource types, 'PPob' ("PowerPlant object" -- a general view description), 'CT Y P' (custom widgets), and Mcmd (used for dispatching menu-related events).

A new version, PowerPlant X, was introduced in 2004 as a native Carbon framework, using Carbon Events.

After Metrowerks was acquired by Motorola, then spun out as part of Freescale Semiconductor, PowerPlant and the rest of the CodeWarrior desktop development tools were discontinued. In February 2006, the PowerPlant class libraries were released as open source under the BSD license hosted on SourceForge. Although it could theoretically be recompiled for x86-64 Macs, it is Carbon-dependent and therefore can be used in 32-bit mode only.

During its heyday, PowerPlant was the most popular framework available for Mac programmers, replacing both the THINK Class Library and MacApp as the premier object-oriented toolkit for the MacOS; however, the transition to OS X was rather difficult for many programmers.

Famous quotes containing the words power and/or plant:

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    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

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    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)