PIN

PIN may be an abbreviation for:

  • Personal identification number, a password used to access an automated teller machine or other secured system
    • Blackberry PIN, an eight character hexadecimal identification number assigned to a BlackBerry device
  • People In Need (disambiguation) (PIN), various NGOs and charities
  • Person In Need of Supervision (PINS), a truant in family court
  • PIN diode (p-type, intrinsic, n-type diode), a type of a semiconductor diode
  • PIN Group, a German courier and postal services company
  • Postal Index Number, used in India, often called a PIN code
  • Posterior interosseous nerve, a nerve in the forearm
  • Progressive inflammatory neuropathy, a type of neuropathy that causes acute paralysis, weakness, and numbness
  • Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a microscopic lesion in the prostate which is thought to be a precursor to prostate cancer

Famous quotes containing the word pin:

    Maybe we were the blind mechanics of disaster, but you don’t pin the guilt on the scientists that easily. You might as well pin it on M motherhood.... Every man who ever worked on this thing told you what would happen. The scientists signed petition after petition, but nobody listened. There was a choice. It was build the bombs and use them, or risk that the United States and the Soviet Union and the rest of us would find some way to go on living.
    John Paxton (1911–1985)

    Suddenly we have a baby who poops and cries, and we are trying to calm, clean up, and pin things together all at once. Then as fast as we learn to cope—so soon—it is hard to recall why diapers ever seemed so important. The frontiers change, and now perhaps we have a teenager we can’t reach.
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century)

    It is not, truly speaking, the labour that is divided; but the men: divided into mere segments of men—broken into small fragments and crumbs of life, so that all the little piece of intelligence that is left in a man is not enough to make a pin, or a nail, but exhausts itself in making the point of a pin or the head of a nail.
    John Ruskin (1819–1900)