Philip Roth

Philip Roth

Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933) is an American novelist. He gained fame with the 1959 novella Goodbye, Columbus, an irreverent and humorous portrait of American-Jewish life that earned him the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction. In 1969 he became a major celebrity with the publication of the controversial Portnoy's Complaint, the humorous and sexually explicit psychoanalytical monologue of "a lust-ridden, mother-addicted young Jewish bachelor", filled with "intimate, shameful detail, and coarse, abusive language".

Roth has been one of the most honored authors of his generation: his books have twice been awarded the National Book Award, twice the National Book Critics Circle award, and three times the PEN/Faulkner Award. He received a Pulitzer Prize for his 1997 novel, American Pastoral, which featured one of his best-known characters, Nathan Zuckerman, the subject of many other of Roth's novels. His 2000 novel The Human Stain, another Zuckerman novel, was awarded the United Kingdom's WH Smith Literary Award for the best book of the year. His fiction, set frequently in Newark, New Jersey, is known for its intensely autobiographical character, for philosophically and formally blurring the distinction between reality and fiction, for its "supple, ingenious style" and for its provocative explorations of Jewish and American identity. Roth has been named winner of Spain’s 2012 Prince of Asturias Award for Literature in recognition of his formidable contribution to American literature.

Read more about Philip Roth:  Life, Career, Influences and Themes, Awards and Honors, List of Awards and Nominations

Famous quotes containing the words philip and/or roth:

    I shall not want Honour in Heaven
    For I shall meet Sir Philip Sidney
    And have talk with Coriolanus
    And other heroes of that kidney.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    Obviously the facts are never just coming at you but are incorporated by an imagination that is formed by your previous experience. Memories of the past are not memories of facts but memories of your imaginings of the facts.
    —Philip Roth (b. 1933)