Perfect Competition

Perfect Competition


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In economic theory, perfect competition describes markets such that no participants are large enough to have the market power to set the price of a homogeneous product. Because the conditions for perfect competition are strict, there are few if any perfectly competitive markets. Still, buyers and sellers in some auction-type markets, say for commodities or some financial assets, may approximate the concept. Perfect competition serves as a benchmark against which to measure real-life and imperfectly competitive markets.

Read more about Perfect Competition:  Basic Structural Characteristics, Approaches and Conditions, Results, The Shutdown Point, Short-run Supply Curve, Examples, Criticisms, Equilibrium in Perfect Competition

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