Parsley - Cultivation

Cultivation

Parsley (raw)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 151 kJ (36 kcal)
Carbohydrates 6.3 g
- Sugars 0.9 g
- Dietary fibre 3.3 g
Fat 0.8 g
Protein 3.0 g
Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.1 mg (9%)
Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.2 mg (17%)
Niacin (vit. B3) 1.3 mg (9%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.4 mg (8%)
Vitamin B6 0.1 mg (8%)
Folate (vit. B9) 152 μg (38%)
Vitamin C 133.0 mg (160%)
Vitamin K 1640.0 μg (1562%)
Calcium 138.0 mg (14%)
Iron 6.2 mg (48%)
Magnesium 50.0 mg (14%)
Phosphorus 58.0 mg (8%)
Potassium 554 mg (12%)
Zinc 1.1 mg (12%)
Percentages are relative to
US recommendations for adults.

Parsley grows best in moist, well drained soil, with full sun. It grows best between 22–30 °C, and is usually grown from seed. Germination is slow, taking four to six weeks, and often difficult because of furanocoumarins in its seed coat. Plants grown for the leaf crop are typically spaced 10 cm apart, while those grown as a root crop are typically spaced 20 cm apart to allow for the root development.

Parsley attracts some wildlife. Some swallowtail butterflies use parsley as a host plant for their larvae; their caterpillars are black and green striped with yellow dots, and will feed on parsley for two weeks before turning into butterflies. Bees and other nectar-feeding insects visit the flowers. Birds such as the goldfinch feed on the seeds.

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