Outdoor Relief

After the passing of the Elizabethan Poor Law (1601), outdoor relief was that kind of poor relief where assistance was in the form of money, food, clothing or goods, given to alleviate poverty without the requirement that the recipient enter an institution. In contrast, recipients of indoor relief were required to enter a workhouse or poorhouse. Outdoor relief was also a feature of the Scottish and Irish Poor Law systems.

Famous quotes containing the words outdoor and/or relief:

    We put [young children] into kindergarten where their reasoning powers are ruined; or, if we can afford it, we buy Montessori outfits that were invented for semi-imbeciles in Italian slums; or we send them to outdoor schools and give them prizes for sleeping.
    Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    The society would permit no books of fiction in its collection because the town fathers believed that fiction ‘worketh abomination and maketh a lie.’
    —For the State of Rhode Island, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)