Open Source Video Game

An open source video game, or simply an open source game, is a video game whose source code is open source. They are often freely distributable and sometimes cross-platform compatible. Many are included in Linux distributions as a result.

Open source games which are free software and contain exclusively free content are called free games. Most free games are open source, but not all open source games are free software; some open source games contain proprietary non-free content.

Read more about Open Source Video Game:  Background

Famous quotes containing the words video game, open, source, video and/or game:

    It is among the ranks of school-age children, those six- to twelve-year-olds who once avidly filled their free moments with childhood play, that the greatest change is evident. In the place of traditional, sometimes ancient childhood games that were still popular a generation ago, in the place of fantasy and make- believe play . . . today’s children have substituted television viewing and, most recently, video games.
    Marie Winn (20th century)

    Listen to me, as if I were Sybaris barking with all his heads, at the gates of Hell, I will tell you where to take it. But don’t ... don’t open the box!
    —A.I. (Albert Isaac)

    Concupiscence and force are the source of all our actions; concupiscence causes voluntary actions, force involuntary ones.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)

    I recently learned something quite interesting about video games. Many young people have developed incredible hand, eye, and brain coordination in playing these games. The air force believes these kids will be our outstanding pilots should they fly our jets.
    Ronald Reagan (b. 1911)

    The indispensable ingredient of any game worth its salt is that the children themselves play it and, if not its sole authors, share in its creation. Watching TV’s ersatz battles is not the same thing at all. Children act out their emotions, they don’t talk them out and they don’t watch them out. Their imagination and their muscles need each other.
    Leontine Young (20th century)