Oakbank Primary School

Oakbank Primary School

Coordinates: 56°23′49″N 3°26′13″W / 56.397°N 3.437°W / 56.397; -3.437

Perth
Scottish Gaelic: Peairt
Scots: Pairth
St John's Toun (old name)
The Fair City (nickname)

View to Tay Street in Perth
Perth
Population 50,000
OS grid reference NO115235
Council area Perth and Kinross
Lieutenancy area Perth and Kinross
Country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town PERTH
Postcode district PH1-PH3; PH14
Dialling code 01738
Police Scottish
Fire Scottish
Ambulance Scottish
EU Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament Perth and North Perthshire
Scottish Parliament Perthshire North
Perthshire South and Kinross-shire
List of places
UK
Scotland

Perth ((i/pɛrθ/; Scottish Gaelic: Peairt) is a city in central Scotland, located on the banks of the River Tay. It is the administrative centre of Perth and Kinross council area and the historic county town of Perthshire. According to the preliminary 2011 census results Perth, including its immediate suburbs, has a population of 50,000. Perth has been known as The Fair City since the publication of the story Fair Maid of Perth by Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott in 1828. During the later medieval period the town was also called St John's Toun or Saint Johnstoun by its inhabitants in reference to the main church dedicated to St John the Baptist. This name is preserved by the town's football team, St. Johnstone F.C.

The name Perth comes from a Pictish word for wood or copse. There has been a settlement at Perth since prehistoric times, on a natural mound raised slightly above the flood plain of the Tay, where the river could be crossed at low tide. The area surrounding the modern city is known to have been occupied since Mesolithic hunter-gatherers arrived more than 8000 years ago. Nearby Neolithic standing stones and circles also exist, dating from about 4000 BC, following the introduction of farming in the area.

The presence of Scone Abbey, home of the Stone of Destiny where the King of Scots was crowned, enhanced the early importance of the town. Perth became known as a 'capital' of Scotland, due to the frequent residence of the royal court. Royal Burgh status was soon given to the town by King William The Lion in the early 12th century. The town became one of the richest burghs in the country, doing trade with France, the Low Countries and Baltic Countries for goods such as Spanish silk and French wine.

The Scottish Reformation also played a big role in the town with the sacking of the Houses of the Greyfriars and Blackfriars, after a sermon given by John Knox in St John's Kirk in 1559. The Act of settlement later brought about Jacobite uprisings. The town was occupied by Jacobite supporters on three occasions (1689, 1715 and 1745). The founding of Perth Academy in 1760 helped to bring major industries to the town, such as linen, leather, bleach and whisky. Given its location, Perth was perfectly placed to become a key transport centre with the coming of the railways, and its first station was built in 1848.

Today, Perth serves as a retail centre for the surrounding area. Following the decline of the whisky industry locally, the city's economy has now diversified to include insurance and banking. Due to its location, the town is often referred to as the 'Gateway to the Highlands'.

Read more about Oakbank Primary School:  History, Governance, Demography, Climate, Economy, Culture, Sport and Recreation, Education, Judicial System, Transport

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