Northrop Frye

Northrop Frye

Herman Northrop "Norrie" Frye, CC FRSC (July 14, 1912 – January 23, 1991) was a Canadian literary critic and literary theorist, considered one of the most influential of the 20th century.

Frye gained international fame with his first book, Fearful Symmetry (1947), which led to the reinterpretation of the poetry of William Blake. His lasting reputation rests principally on the theory of literary criticism that he developed in Anatomy of Criticism (1957), one of the most important works of literary theory published in the twentieth century. American critic Harold Bloom commented at the time of its publication that Anatomy established Frye as "the foremost living student of Western literature." Frye's contributions to cultural and social criticism spanned a long career during which he earned widespread recognition and received many honours.

Read more about Northrop Frye:  Contribution To Literary Criticism, Works By Northrop Frye, Awards and Honors

Famous quotes by northrop frye:

    It is of the essence of imaginative culture that it transcends the limits both of the naturally possible and of the morally acceptable.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)

    In our day the conventional element in literature is elaborately disguised by a law of copyright pretending that every work of art is an invention distinctive enough to be patented.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)

    Popular art is normally decried as vulgar by the cultivated people of its time; then it loses favor with its original audience as a new generation grows up; then it begins to merge into the softer lighting of ‘quaint,’ and cultivated people become interested in it, and finally it begins to take on the archaic dignity of the primitive.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)

    A reader who quarrels with postulates, who dislikes Hamlet because he does not believe that there are ghosts or that people speak in pentameters, clearly has no business in literature. He cannot distinguish fiction from fact, and belongs in the same category as the people who send cheques to radio stations for the relief of suffering heroines in soap operas.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)

    Between religion’s ‘this is’ and poetry’s ‘but suppose this is,’ there must always be some kind of tension, until the possible and the actual meet at infinity.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)