Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association

The Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (Irish: Cumann Chearta Sibhialta Thuaisceart √Čireann) was an organisation which campaigned for civil rights for the Roman Catholic minority in Northern Ireland during the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Read more about Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association:  Origins, First Civil Rights March, Derry March, 1969 Riots, Bloody Sunday, People Associated With NICRA

Famous quotes containing the words northern ireland, northern, ireland, civil, rights and/or association:

    ... in Northern Ireland, if you don’t have basic Christianity, rather than merely religion, all you get out of the experience of living is bitterness.
    Bernadette Devlin (b. 1947)

    The northern sky rose high and black
    Over the proud unfruitful sea,
    East and west the ships came back
    Happily or unhappily....
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)

    Life springs from death and from the graves of patriot men and women spring living nations.... They think that they have pacified Ireland. They think that they have purchased half of us and intimidated the other half. They think that they have foreseen everything, think they have provided against everything; but the fools, the fools, the fools, they have left us our Fenian dead, and while Ireland holds these graves Ireland unfree shall never be at peace.
    Patrick Henry Pearse (1879–1916)

    We have heard all of our lives how, after the Civil War was over, the South went back to straighten itself out and make a living again. It was for many years a voiceless part of the government. The balance of power moved away from it—to the north and the east. The problems of the north and the east became the big problem of the country and nobody paid much attention to the economic unbalance the South had left as its only choice.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    She, too, would now swim down the river of matrimony with a beautiful name, and a handle to it, as the owner of a fine family property. Women’s rights was an excellent doctrine to preach, but for practice could not stand the strain of such temptation.
    Anthony Trollope (1815–1882)

    With all their faults, trade-unions have done more for humanity than any other organization of men that ever existed. They have done more for decency, for honesty, for education, for the betterment of the race, for the developing of character in man, than any other association of men.
    Clarence Darrow (1857–1938)