Nonsense Verse

Nonsense verse is a form of light, often rhythmical verse, often for children, depicting peculiar characters in amusing and fantastical situations. It is whimsical and humorous in tone and tends to employ fanciful phrases and meaningless made-up words. Nonsense verse is closely related to Amphigouri (Greek amphi- (q.v.) + gyros "circle," thus "circle on both sides," or from Gk. -agoria "speech"), which is a meaningless or nonsensical piece of writing, especially one intended as a parody.

Limericks are probably the best known form of nonsense verse, although they tend nowadays to be used for bawdy or straightforwardly humorous, rather than nonsensical, effect.

Among writers in English noted for nonsense verse are Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll, Ogden Nash, Mervyn Peake, Colin West, Roald Dahl, Dr. Seuss and Spike Milligan. The Martian Poets and Ivor Cutler are considered by some to be in the nonsense tradition.

Read more about Nonsense Verse:  Variants, Usage, Other Languages

Famous quotes containing the words nonsense and/or verse:

    Haiti is full of nonsense and superstition. They’re always mixed up with a lot of mysteries that’ll turn your hair gray.
    —Garnett Weston. Victor Halperin. Dr. Brunner (Joseph Cawthorn)

    My verse your virtues rare shall eternize,
    And in the heavens write your glorious name.
    Where, whenas death shall all the world subdue,
    Our love shall live, and later life renew.
    Edmund Spenser (1552?–1599)