Nintendo DS - History

History

On November 13, 2003, Nintendo announced that they would be releasing a new game product in 2004. The company didn't provide many details, but stated it would not succeed the Game Boy Advance or GameCube. On January 20, 2004, the console was announced under the codename "Nintendo DS" (which initially stood for Developer's System). Nintendo only released a few details at that time, saying that the console would have two separate, 3-inch TFT LCD display panels, separate processors, and up to 1 gigabit of semiconductor memory. Nintendo president Satoru Iwata said, "We have developed Nintendo DS based upon a completely different concept from existing game devices in order to provide players with a unique entertainment experience for the 21st century." He also expressed optimism that the DS would help put Nintendo back at the forefront of innovation and move away from the conservative image that has been described about the company in years past. In March 2004, the codename was changed to "Nitro" and a document containing most of the console's technical specifications was leaked. In May 2004, the codename was changed back to "Nintendo DS" and the console was shown in prototype form at the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3). All the features of the console were revealed by Nintendo at E3. On July 28, 2004, Nintendo revealed a new design, one that was described as "sleeker and more elegant" than the one shown at E3. Also, the codename "Nintendo DS" became the official name of the console that day.

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