National Book Award

National Book Award

The National Book Awards are a set of annual U.S. literary awards. At the final "National Book Awards Ceremony" every November, the National Book Foundation presents the NBAs and two lifetime achievement awards to people.

The National Book Awards were established in 1936 by the American Booksellers Association, abandoned during World War II, and re-established by three book industry organizations in 1950. Non-U.S. authors and publishers were eligible for the pre-war awards. Now they are presented to U.S. authors for books published in the United States roughly during the award year.

The nonprofit National Book Foundation was established in 1988 to administer and enhance the Book Awards and "move beyond into the fields of education and literacy", primarily by sponsoring public appearances by writers. Its mission is "to celebrate the best of American literature, to expand its audience, and to enhance the cultural value of good writing in America."

In 2010, there were 1,115 books nominated for the four award categories, led by the Nonfiction category with 435 nominations. The 2011 ceremony was held on November 16 in New York City.

Read more about National Book Award:  Winners and Finalists, Current Process, Annual Eligibility, Medal For Distinguished Contribution (lifetime), Literarian Award For Outstanding Service (lifetime), Criticism

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