Natalia Lafourcade - Natalia Y La Forquetina Era

Natalia Y La Forquetina Era

In 2005, she released Casa, her second album, but this time as Natalia y La Forquetina (the name of her band). Produced mostly by Café Tacuba's Emmanuel del Real, Casa presents a more mature, rock-oriented sound while retaining pop and bossa-nova influences on a few tracks, such as lead single "Ser Humano" (pop-rock) and its follow-up "Casa" (pop-bossa-nova). Aureo Baqueiro returned to produce the few tracks not produced by del Real.

In 2006, after a tour through Mexico and parts of the U.S., on June 2, Natalia announced that she will be leaving La Forquetina to once again work as a solo artist. Natalia y la Forquetina's final show was played on August 18, 2006 in San Luis Potosí. Following the group's break-up, Casa won the Latin Grammy for Best Rock Album by a Duo or Group with Vocal in September.

Also in 2006, a documentary about the band was made, mostly showing the group on the road and their travels. The documentary was aired on MTV Tr3s in the fall of 2007.

In 2008 she played in Julieta Venegas' MTV Unplugged.

Natalia Lafourcade has also appeared on other songs with various other artists. These include Liquits' "Jardin", Kalimba's "Dia de Suerte", Control Machete's "El Apostador", and Reik's rendition of a Lafourcade song "Amarte Duele". Also she along with her former band have appeared on various compilation disks with previously unreleased tracks such as "Y Todo Para Que" on Intocable's X and on the Tin Tan tribute album, Viva Tin Tan, with the hit "Piel Canela". In 2011, she made a very clever and popular music video with Los Daniels called "Quisiera Saber."

After over a year that Natalia departed from La Forquetina, she recorded an instrumental album called The 4 Seasons of Love under Sony BMG label. She also wrote the Lyrics for "Tú y Yo" from Ximena Sariñana's self-titled album.

In 2012 she released a tribute album to Agustín Lara.

Read more about this topic:  Natalia Lafourcade

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