Murder of Sophie Lancaster

The Murder of Sophie Lancaster was a murder case in the United Kingdom in 2007. The victim, along with her boyfriend, Robert Maltby, was attacked by a number of males in their mid-teens while walking through Stubbylee Park in Bacup, Rossendale, in Lancashire. As a result of her severe head injuries she went into a coma, never regained consciousness, and died thirteen days later. The police said the attack may have been provoked by the couple's wearing gothic fashion and being members of the goth subculture.

Five teenage boys were later arrested and charged with murder. Two of them were convicted of murder and sentenced to life-imprisonment. The other three were convicted and jailed for grievous bodily harm. A memorial fund was established in Sophie's name, and numerous events have paid tribute to her locally, nationally and abroad. Plays, films, art and books have dealt with the issues surrounding the murder.

Read more about Murder Of Sophie Lancaster:  Background, The Attack, Arrests and Investigation, Trial and Aftermath, Tributes To Sophie Lancaster, Media Reaction, Reaction in The Goth and Alternative Community, See Also

Famous quotes containing the words murder of and/or murder:

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